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What causes a traumatic brain injury?

According to the United States Center for Disease Control and Prevention, there were 2.5 million people in 2010 who who suffered from a traumatic brain injury (TBI). 50,000 people die as the result of a traumatic brain injury each year, and 85,000 people suffer long-term disabilities. In the United States, more than 5.3 million people live with disabilities and deficits caused by a traumatic brain injury.

Traumatic brain injuries can be caused by a bump, blow or jolt to the head or a penetrating heading injury that disrupts the normal function of the brain. The leading causes of traumatic brain injuries are automobile accidents, firearms and falls. 

Over half of all reported traumatic brain injuries are the result of an automobile accident. As a result of an automobile accident the force of the accident can cause the brain to collide against the internal hard bone of the skull. This occurs as a result of the previously moving head coming to an abrupt stop, while the brain continues to move. This continued movement in the brain causes it to strike the interior of the skull and can cause bruising and bleeding to take place.

An individual can also suffer a TBI as a result of an automobile accident, when a moving head strikes a stationary object, such as a window in your vehicle. The impact of the head on the stationary object usually causes an open wound and can also cause injury to the brain as the brain strikes the interior of the skull. 

After suffering a traumatic brain injury an individual may experience changes or deficits that affect their thinking, sensation, language, or emotions. If you or someone you love has suffered a traumatic brain injury as the result of another persons' negligence, contact Miller Law Firm. We are privileged to have helped several North Carolina families when their loved ones suffered a traumatic brain injury as the result of someone else's negligence.

http://www.cdc.gov/traumaticbraininjury/basics.html

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